Category Archives: Published Work

Kitchen Garden, CAPE COD HOME

The Nantucket Historical Association's Oldest House may be a seventeenth-century jewel of antiquity, but the sweet kitchen garden at the 1686 Jethro Coffin saltbox is the apple of my eye.

The Nantucket Historical Association’s Oldest House may be a seventeenth-century jewel of antiquity, but the sweet kitchen garden at the 1686 Jethro Coffin saltbox is the apple of my eye.

Kathrina Pearl, a Nantucket Historical Association (NHA) staff member and avid gardener, and the NHA grounds crew have adopted the backyard at the Oldest House, planting a long list of period pot plants, culinary and medicinal herbs, a small orchard of fruit trees, and some berries.  "The idea for the garden came from the interpreters at the site," says Pearl.

Kathrina Pearl, a Nantucket Historical Association (NHA) staff member and avid gardener, and the NHA grounds crew have adopted the backyard at the Oldest House, planting a long list of period pot plants, culinary and medicinal herbs, a small orchard of fruit trees, and some berries. “The idea for the garden came from the interpreters at the site,” says Pearl.

The Oldest House nestles into the landscape at the top of Sunset Hill.  It was built as a wedding gift for Jethro Coffin and his new bride, Mary.  According to the NHA, it is the "sole surviving structure from the island's original seventeenth-century English settlement."

The Oldest House nestles into the landscape at the top of Sunset Hill. It was built as a wedding gift for Jethro Coffin and his new bride, Mary. According to the NHA, it is the “sole surviving structure from the island’s original seventeenth-century English settlement.”

http://www.capecodlife.com/capecodhome

Companion Planting, CAPE COD HOME

The hillside garden at Satucket Farm Stand in Brewster, Massachusetts bursts with blossoms.  “I love the textures of greens in spring,” says Anita Anderson.   “I love Solomon’s Seal and Lily of the Valley, they smell so nice.”  Other spring favorites include daffodils, tulips, Bleeding Heart, and Jacob’s Ladder.   Summer brings on a riot of color.  “Monarda, oh my goodness, the red, a bright red.  I have a deep purple butterfly bush, sedum autumn joy, tons of veronica, a blue balloon flower, astilbe in white and pink and red.”

The hillside garden at Satucket Farm Stand in Brewster, Massachusetts bursts with blossoms. “I love the textures of greens in spring,” says Anita Anderson. “I love Solomon’s Seal and Lily of the Valley, they smell so nice.” Other spring favorites include daffodils, tulips, Bleeding Heart, and Jacob’s Ladder. Summer brings on a riot of color. “Monarda, oh my goodness, the red, a bright red. I have a deep purple butterfly bush, sedum autumn joy, tons of veronica, a blue balloon flower, astilbe in white and pink and red.”

Satucket’s cutting bed  is exuberantly wild with cosmos, sunflowers, cleome, and zinnias all vying for attention.  Anita has nurtured these plants from seed, starting them under lights in her basement the last months of winter.  “During February I go nuts and have to mail order seeds.  I really like Johnny’s Selected Seeds, their flowers seem stronger, healthier than any other supplier I have tried.”

Satucket’s cutting bed is exuberantly wild with cosmos, sunflowers, cleome, and zinnias all vying for attention. Anita has nurtured these plants from seed, starting them under lights in her basement the last months of winter. “During February I go nuts and have to mail order seeds. I really like Johnny’s Selected Seeds, their flowers seem stronger, healthier than any other supplier I have tried.”

Another favorite vendor is a local Orleans grower, The Farm.  “They do an amazing job.  They grow their own perennials and have great stock.”

Another favorite vendor is a local Orleans grower, The Farm. “They do an amazing job. They grow their own perennials and have great stock.”

A stand of sunflowers painted on the barn door was a Mothers’ Day gift.  “The kids asked me what I wanted for Mothers’ Day and that’s what I wanted.  I didn’t need fresh flowers, I didn’t need food.”  Although her kids are absent, she now has their constant presence in the form of sunny flowers on the door.<br /><br /><br /><br />

A stand of sunflowers painted on the barn door was a Mothers’ Day gift. “The kids asked me what I wanted for Mothers’ Day and that’s what I wanted. I didn’t need fresh flowers, I didn’t need food.” Although her kids are absent, she now has their constant presence in the form of sunny flowers on the door.

Golden Earthworm, GARDENS ILLUSTRATED

Photographing Golden Earthworm  was a visual delight.  The organic farm, located on the North Fork of Long Island, grows mouthwatering veg and a vibrant display of cutting flowers.

Photographing Golden Earthworm was a visual delight. The organic farm, located on the North Fork of Long Island, grows mouthwatering veg and a vibrant display of cutting flowers.

Maggie Wood, Matthew Kurek, and James Russo were a treat to work with and made sure I had access to all parts of the farm -- from riding out to the fields with an incredibly cheerful, hardworking Mexican family to watching the careful processing and packing of the CSA shares.

Maggie Wood, Matthew Kurek, and James Russo were a treat to work with and made sure I had access to all parts of the farm — from riding out to the fields with an incredibly cheerful, hardworking Mexican family to watching the careful processing and packing of the CSA shares.

Maggie Wood and I put together a lunch of Golden Earthworm's fingerling potatoes roasted in garlic and olive oil and a colorful salad of just picked tomatoes with a sprinkling of fresh picked herbs.

Maggie Wood and I put together a lunch of Golden Earthworm’s fingerling potatoes roasted in garlic and olive oil and a colorful salad of just picked tomatoes with a sprinkling of fresh picked herbs.

http://www.goldenearthworm.com

http://www.gardensillustrated.com

Sharing the Harvest by Elizabeth Henderson and Robyn Van En, Chelsea Green Publishing Company, 2007

A Place in the Shade, CAPE COD HOME

To cover the demise of early spring foliage, plant lots of hostas in all their many foliage shapes, from heart-shaped to cupped and wrinkled.  As the hostas emerge, their leaves will fill bare spaces.

To cover the demise of early spring foliage, plant lots of hostas in all their many foliage shapes, from heart-shaped to cupped and wrinkled. As the hostas emerge, their leaves will fill bare spaces.

There are many varieties of ferns for the shade garden including the delicate maidenhair with black stems supporting finely cut bright green fronds and the Japanese painted fern with burgundy red veins radiating to a pale whitish gray-green.

There are many varieties of ferns for the shade garden including the delicate maidenhair with black stems supporting finely cut bright green fronds and the Japanese painted fern with burgundy red veins radiating to a pale whitish gray-green.

At one end of their courtyard,  white paper birch rises from a base of gray-green hostas, ferns, and euonymus.<br /><br />

At one end of their courtyard, white paper birch rises from a base of gray-green hostas, ferns, and euonymus.
While Betsy and E.B. Wilson work with a peaceful palette, it doesn't mean that all places shady need to be tempered.  Foliage plants for shade can be a cacophony of color.  Coleus are exotic annual clowns with leaves splashed in daring combinations of burgundy and chartreuse.

While Betsy and E.B. Wilson work with a peaceful palette, it doesn’t mean that all places shady need to be tempered. Foliage plants for shade can be a cacophony of color. Coleus are exotic annual clowns with leaves splashed in daring combinations of burgundy and chartreuse.

http://www.capecodlife.com/capecodhome

Garden Accents, CAPE COD HOME

Hanging baskets, garden gates, terra-cotta urns are some of the many accoutrements you will find in Pat McLoud's garden.  A hammock is strung between shade trees for a relaxing nap on a hot day.  Spheres grace pedestals and all around beautiful plantings backed by arborvitae, conical white Hydrangea paniculata blossoms mix with deep purple tubular cones of a butterfly bush.

Hanging baskets, garden gates, terra-cotta urns are some of the many accoutrements you will find in Pat McLoud’s garden. A hammock is strung between shade trees for a relaxing nap on a hot day. Spheres grace pedestals and all around beautiful plantings backed by arborvitae, conical white Hydrangea paniculata blossoms mix with deep purple tubular cones of a butterfly bush.

To McLoud, accessorizing a garden is similar to accessorizing a home.  it is accessories which delight the eye, with their repetition of structure and shape - even when the garden is in full bloom

To McLoud, accessorizing a garden is similar to accessorizing a home. it is accessories which delight the eye, with their repetition of structure and shape – even when the garden is in full bloom

With a few strong structural elements -- boxwood, arborvitae, and gravel -- McLoud has provided bones for her gardens to rest on and against.

With a few strong structural elements — boxwood, arborvitae, and gravel — McLoud has provided bones for her gardens to rest on and against.

CCH McLoud4

Growing to Extremes, GARDENS ILLUSTRATED

Rice is nice, especially when grown in Vermont's cold climate!   I was thoroughly captivated with every step of the process and was proud when I had a chance to step into the paddy and plant seedlings alongside Takeshi and Linda Akaogi.

Rice is nice, especially when grown in Vermont’s cold climate! I was thoroughly captivated with every step of the process and was proud when I had a chance to step into the paddy and plant seedlings alongside Takeshi and Linda Akaogi.

The Birds and the Bees, CAPE COD HOME

The wild honey bees arrived and kept arriving.  What a pleasure to be in the presence of their happy humming, little legs overloaded with masses of pale yellow pollen.

The wild honey bees arrived and kept arriving. What a pleasure to be in the presence of their happy humming, little legs overloaded with masses of pale yellow pollen.

Sunflowers of all shape, size, and color sprout up in the arugula bed and in borders outside the confines of our fence.  Some are planted by us but others are volunteers dropped by sunny goldfinches who come looking for treats as soon as the flower heads mature.

Sunflowers of all shape, size, and color sprout up in the arugula bed and in borders outside the confines of our fence. Some are planted by us but others are volunteers dropped by sunny goldfinches who come looking for treats as soon as the flower heads mature.