Tag Archives: Jane Booth story production

Orchid Fever, CAPE COD HOME

Phalaenopsis.  Growing orchids in your home can be rewarding.

Phalaenopsis. Growing orchids in your home can be rewarding.

1. Ionocidium "popcorn 2. Cypripedium Acaule (native pink lady slipper 3. Oncidium 4. Phalaenopsis

1. Ionocidium “popcorn 2. Cypripedium Acaule (native pink lady slipper 3. Oncidium 4. Phalaenopsis

Paphpedium, Miltassia 'Miltonia x Brassia', Dendrobium

Paphpedium, Miltassia ‘Miltonia x Brassia’, Dendrobium

 

 

Garden Inspiration, CAPE COD HOME

I still have the books my mother bought in her quest for garden knowledge.  I've bought many more in my adult life as they are a wonderful source of inspiration.My best friends for the vegetable garden are “how to” books letting me know  the onions are ready to harvest when their green tops have toppled over and to pull the garlic when the browning stems are tilting toward the ground.  I have books on tending perennials and books on herbs and annuals.  They are all an inspiration.

I still have the books my mother bought in her quest for garden knowledge. I’ve bought many more in my adult life as they are a wonderful source of inspiration.
My best friends for the vegetable garden are “how to” books letting me know the onions are ready to harvest when their green tops have toppled over and to pull the garlic when the browning stems are tilting toward the ground. I have books on tending perennials and books on herbs and annuals. They are all an inspiration.

When we are on the road and have the time I like searching out antique and junk stores for old garden tools, often sturdier than what is manufactured today though I have not been able to bring them into the garden, I just like looking at them and thinking about the hands that used them many years ago and the gardens they might have helped create.  I also hunt for old terra cotta pots, especially small pots to start seeds in.  They don’t retain moisture like plastic, but they look fantastic and you don’t toss them in the landfill when your plants have grown!

When we are on the road and have the time I like searching out antique and junk stores for old garden tools, often sturdier than what is manufactured today though I have not been able to bring them into the garden, I just like looking at them and thinking about the hands that used them many years ago and the gardens they might have helped create. I also hunt for old terra cotta pots, especially small pots to start seeds in. They don’t retain moisture like plastic, but they look fantastic and you don’t toss them in the landfill when your plants have grown!

Some of the best  inspiration comes from visiting gardens open to the public whether personal or private.  I have often buy plants or put together color combinations I have seen in someone elses garden.  The Garden Conservancy, www.gardenconservancy.org, publishes The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Directory, A Guide to Visiting America’s Best Private Gardens.

Some of the best inspiration comes from visiting gardens open to the public whether personal or private. I have often buy plants or put together color combinations I have seen in someone elses garden. The Garden Conservancy, http://www.gardenconservancy.org, publishes The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Directory, A Guide to Visiting America’s Best Private Gardens.

In the early winter I look forward to the arrival of seed and plant catalogues that I keep for reference and to drive a gardener crazy with want.

In the early winter I look forward to the arrival of seed and plant catalogues that I keep for reference and to drive a gardener crazy with want.

Riddle of the Catskill Mountains, GARDENS ILLUSTRATED

Dean Riddle's Catskill gardens are amazing.  I was blessed to be given the opportunity to photograph them for the greatest garden magazine in the world, Gardens Illustrated.

Dean Riddle’s Catskill gardens are amazing. I was blessed to be given the opportunity to photograph them for the greatest garden magazine in the world, Gardens Illustrated.

NEG Dean Riddle WEB2

 

Wonderful whimsy, exuberant color, Dean Riddle’s Catskill Mountain garden made me smile.

Dean Riddle creates  extraordinary plant combinations.

Dean Riddle creates extraordinary plant combinations.

 

Ruth Kirchmeier, Carved by Nature, CAPE COD HOME

Ruth Kirchmeier, Martha's Vineyard woodcut artist and gardenerWhen I met Ruth Kirchmeier I didn’t know she was a woodcut artist but thought  she must be a sculptor of tall columnar things, her garden suggested so with upright narrow hollies and yews. I imagined her hands chipping away at stout totems of wood.  I had the medium right but the art form wrong, instead of totems she chips away at flat fields of pine, cutting into wood visual scenes close to her life such as a simple vignette of her dining room where a forsythia filled vase placed on a red runner radiates with the sun’s energy.

Ruth Kirchmeier, Martha’s Vineyard woodcut artist and gardener
When I met Ruth Kirchmeier I didn’t know she was a woodcut artist but thought she must be a sculptor of tall columnar things, her garden suggested so with upright narrow hollies and yews. I imagined her hands chipping away at stout totems of wood. I had the medium right but the art form wrong, instead of totems she chips away at flat fields of pine, cutting into wood visual scenes close to her life such as a simple vignette of her dining room where a forsythia filled vase placed on a red runner radiates with the sun’s energy.

“I don’t see the difference between making a woodcut and making a garden, you need the skills to cut the wood and make a garden , the same things go into it, placing things so that there is depth and interest and a certain desire to go around the corner and see what’s happening.

“I don’t see the difference between making a woodcut and making a garden, you need the skills to cut the wood and make a garden , the same things go into it, placing things so that there is depth and interest and a certain desire to go around the corner and see what’s happening.

NEG CCH Kirshmeier 3

House plants are welcome winter friends finding places to reside outside come summer.  A topiaried myrtle came to Ruth by way of her dealer, Hermine.  “She has a small gallery nearby, Hermine Merel Smith Fine Art, one winter she asked me to look after her myrtle and I nurtured it and shaped it.  When I brought it back, she asked if I wouldn’t like to keep it permanently.

House plants are welcome winter friends finding places to reside outside come summer. A topiaried myrtle came to Ruth by way of her dealer, Hermine. “She has a small gallery nearby, Hermine Merel Smith Fine Art, one winter she asked me to look after her myrtle and I nurtured it and shaped it. When I brought it back, she asked if I wouldn’t like to keep it permanently.

 

 

Island Garden, OLD HOUSE JOURNAL’S NEW OLD HOUSE

In the Gulf of Maine, where sky meets sea, lie the Isles of Shoals, haunted with graves of Spanish sailors and tales of pirate gold.  The islands have names that give them shape -- Smutty Nose, Duck, Hog, and White (an acre of stone topped at the pinnacle with light).  Poet Celia Laighton Thaxter's life on Appledore Island inspired her writing and her lifelong connection to the island's terrain.  Her flower garden, celebrated in her book An Island Garden, drew visitors to the island until a fire destroyed the property.  A century after she started her garden, John Kingsbury of Cornell University and a team of volunteers found the remnants of her sanctuary and re-created her summer garden, a floral oasis in the rough, wind-whipped terrain.

In the Gulf of Maine, where sky meets sea, lie the Isles of Shoals, haunted with graves of Spanish sailors and tales of pirate gold. The islands have names that give them shape — Smutty Nose, Duck, Hog, and White (an acre of stone topped at the pinnacle with light). Poet Celia Laighton Thaxter’s life on Appledore Island inspired her writing and her lifelong connection to the island’s terrain. Her flower garden, celebrated in her book An Island Garden, drew visitors to the island until a fire destroyed the property. A century after she started her garden, John Kingsbury of Cornell University and a team of volunteers found the remnants of her sanctuary and re-created her summer garden, a floral oasis in the rough, wind-whipped terrain.

Celia Thaxter's century-old garden on Appledore Island is gaining new life through the dedication of volunteers and the interest of visitors.  The summer tours are almost always sold out and the education and family programs at the Shoals Marine Laboratory are popular.

Celia Thaxter’s century-old garden on Appledore Island is gaining new life through the dedication of volunteers and the interest of visitors. The summer tours are almost always sold out and the education and family programs at the Shoals Marine Laboratory are popular.

Growing to Extremes, GARDENS ILLUSTRATED

Rice is nice, especially when grown in Vermont's cold climate!   I was thoroughly captivated with every step of the process and was proud when I had a chance to step into the paddy and plant seedlings alongside Takeshi and Linda Akaogi.

Rice is nice, especially when grown in Vermont’s cold climate! I was thoroughly captivated with every step of the process and was proud when I had a chance to step into the paddy and plant seedlings alongside Takeshi and Linda Akaogi.

The Birds and the Bees, CAPE COD HOME

The wild honey bees arrived and kept arriving.  What a pleasure to be in the presence of their happy humming, little legs overloaded with masses of pale yellow pollen.

The wild honey bees arrived and kept arriving. What a pleasure to be in the presence of their happy humming, little legs overloaded with masses of pale yellow pollen.

Sunflowers of all shape, size, and color sprout up in the arugula bed and in borders outside the confines of our fence.  Some are planted by us but others are volunteers dropped by sunny goldfinches who come looking for treats as soon as the flower heads mature.

Sunflowers of all shape, size, and color sprout up in the arugula bed and in borders outside the confines of our fence. Some are planted by us but others are volunteers dropped by sunny goldfinches who come looking for treats as soon as the flower heads mature.